CLUTCH INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

 

 

NOTE!

These instructions are intended as a suggested method for clutch removal and replacement. We are not responsible for personal injury or damage done to the vehicle during this process.

 

 

 

 

These instructions are to provide you with the most detailed guide to installing your new clutch assembly. The efforts listed here are provided for cars with basically stock chassis and suspension components. Cars equipped with certain aftermarket sub frame connector arrangements and/or torque arms may require additional efforts to remove your cars transmission. Please refer to the original instructions provided with those parts for removal or installation of mentioned parts.

 

It is highly recommended that you read ALL of these instructions prior to doing the actual work on your car.

 

Before getting started, consider these facts.

 

For cars with mileage exceeding 30,000:

It would be a good idea to replace the pilot bearing during this procedure. It has been found that the pilot bearing can be excessively warn and allow movement or play of the transmission's input shaft, causing possible chatter or contact of the clutch disc against the edges of the pressure plate. This will do nothing but be a hindrance to performance and proper street manners.

 

This would also be an opportune time to replace your transmission mount if it is showing signs of age or wear.

 

Factory GM 1LE mount, part No. 22174970.

 

As this is the best solution for now. Your new clutch assembly is aggressive enough to prematurely fatigue your car's stock rubber mount, even with the use of the stock rubber torque arm mount.

 

Cars equipped with an aftermarket polyurethane torque arm mount:

These are even more susceptible to premature failure. The use of a polyurethane transmission mount is not recommended as in some cases this item has been linked to false knock being registered and the computer pulling out timing, causing a loss or performance.

 

 

 

Recommended tools and supplies.

 

  • 7/16 thin wall socket, 3/8 drive 12 point (Used to bleed the clutch)
  • 4 M10-2.5X50mm Hex head Bolts Class 8.8 (Used to pull transmission down to bell housing)
  • 4 Quarts Dexron III ATF (Refill Transmission)
  • Funnel to fill clutch reservoir with Brake fluid.
  • 1 Quart DOT 3 Brake Fluid (Clutch fluid)
  • Pan to catch 4 quarts of drained transmission fluid.
  • Small tube of silicon gasket material, Red. (Seal shifter to top of transmission)
  • Torque wrench lbs in
  • Torque wrench lbs ft
  • Metric and SAE socket sets , 3/8, &
  • Extensions for sockets. 2 X 18, 1 X 6
  • Breaker bars 3/8
  • Pilot bearing removal tool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disassembly

 

 

STEP

ACTION

 

1

It's always a good idea to disconnect your car's battery before beginning any major work on it. This alleviates the risk of shorting out your cars PCM with would render your car inoperable.

 

2

Begin the removal by unscrewing your shifter knob from the handle. You can then remove the console boot by giving it an aggressive tug at the sides. Be careful as only plastic clips retain this piece.

 

3

Lift the console door and with a 7mm socket remove the two bolts that retain the upper console to the console itself.

 

4

You can now pull the upper portion of the console up and disconnect any accessories attached to it, such as your cigarette lighter plug, ashtray light and traction control harness. With that done you can now remove the upper console.

 

5

Start removing the lower portion of the console by unscrewing the two 10mm bolts on each side of the top of the console, under the dash. Then remove the remaining 10mm bolts located in the console storage area and in the center next to the factory air bag processor.

 

6

Before lifting the lower portion of the console out of the way, you will need to lift the emergency brake handle straight up. To do this you will need to slip a screwdriver or your thumb within the handle's cover boot and disengage the lock that connects the handle to the ratcheting system. You can then remove the lower portion of the console.

 

7

A 13mm socket on a ratchet or open-end wrench is all that's needed to remove the shifter handle from the shifter base.

 

8

Take a 7mm socket and remove the eight bolts that hold the shifter dust cover to the floor-pan, and then pull the cover from the floor.

 

9

Remove the shifter base from the transmission; you'll need a 13mm socket and ratchet. With the four bolts removed, it will require a good tug, possibly even some prying to unfasten the base, due to the silicone installed by the factory to prevent leaks.

 

NOTE: Remember to reapply new silicone when reinstalling the base to prevent leaks. Clean both the transmission and shifter base well before reinstalling.

 

10

You can now move under the car.

 

NOTE: If you are performing this installation without the use of a lift, please make sure you have the car safely secured off the ground with the use of four good-quality jack stands positioned under the frame and not the differential or control arms.

 

Start by unfastening the four 7/16" bolts that hold the driveshaft to the differential. The transmission will need to be in neutral and the emergency brake off. Place a pry bar between the U-joint and the shaft for leverage.

 

11

You now have a choice as to whether or not you want to remove the torque arm to easy the removal and installation of the transmission itself. It is recommended to remove the torque arm all together. To do so, remove the two nut-and-bolt assemblies at differential with an 18mm socket and 21mm open-end wrench.

 

12

Remove the four 15mm bolts that hold the transmission cross-member to the floor of the car and the one 18mm bolt that hold the cross-member to the transmission mount.

 

NOTE: Be sure to have a jack under the transmission, supporting it's weight. With the cross-member removed the transmission will drop a good three-to-five inches.

 

13

Loosen the 15mm bolt at the transmission end that clamps the torque arm bracket together.

 

14

Remove the torque arm altogether. If you chose to leave the torque arm in the car. You simply have to remove the 15mm bolt that clamps the bracket, at the transmission. Pull the removable part of the bracket away and then take the front of the torque arm out of the other half of the bracket and let it rest against the floor of the car.

 

 

NOTE: The front of the torque arm will act as if it's spring-loaded due to the pressure it's under from the weight and angle of the differential. Be very careful when maneuvering the front of the torque arm as risk of injury is high.

 

15

Now unfasten the hanger that locates the exhaust Y-pipe to the transmission by removing the two 14mm bolts that attach the two parts.

 

16

It might be a good idea to remove the driver side oxygen sensor located in the head pipe, next to the transmission itself. You will need a large 7/8" boxed-end wrench to do perform this task. Be sure to apply a small amount of anti-seize compound to the threads of the sensor when reinstalling.

 

17

Now remove the steel-braided hydraulic throw-out bearing line located on the driver's side of the transmission. Take a long pair of needle nose pliers and depress the white-collar ring located just past the brass ring protruding from between the transmission case and bell housing. While depressing the ring, pull back on the fitting (towards the left floor-pan). You should feel the line "pop" and come lose. Then reach up and pull the line out altogether.

 

18

Use a 7mm socket and remove the two bolts that hold the heat shield, covering the hydraulic braided line, to the floor. Leave this part out, as you may be replacing the line and rest of the Master cylinder later.

 

19

Take a 15mm swivel socket and start removing the eight bolts that hold the transmission to the bell housing. Some of the upper bolts will be difficult, but can be managed. The one on the upper right side, which retains the transmission breather tube, will have to be reached with a very long extension from the back of the transmission.

 

NOTE: Make sure the transmission is safely secured on a jack, as it is now ready to be removed once these bolts are out.

 

20

You can now pull the transmission back and out of the car. Having a second person give you a hand is highly recommended, as the transmission weighs 125 lb. and will be a handful to maneuver.

 

21

Using a 14mm socket to remove the eight bolts that hold the bell-housing to the engine. Some prying might be required as bell-housings often become seized to the block due to water corrosion from your car's A/C discharge tube expelling water over the right side of the housing. In this case remove the starter and pry from between the block and bell-housing where the starter mounts.

 

22

Take the 13mm socket and remove the six bolts that hold the pressure plate to the flywheel.

 

NOTE: be careful when doing this as the pressure plate is spring loaded against the flywheel.

 

Remove the bolts in a crisscross pattern. Once you're down to removing the last bolt, secure the pressure plate with one hand against the flywheel so it doesn't drop when the final bolt is removed. Be warned the pressure plate is somewhat heavy. The clutch disk will also be free, so when you pull away the pressure plate, be prepared to catch the clutch disk, too.

 

23

Your final step in the removal process is to unfasten your original flywheel. You can do this with a 15mm socket and an impact gun or large breaker-bar. The flywheel is fastened by the factory to 74 Lb ft. so it will be a bit tough to break the bolts free. You must stop the engine from turning to break the bolts free. You'll need a flywheel retention tool to do so.

 

REASSEMBLY

 

The reassemble process is a reversal of the removal, the only difference being you now have to torque bolts to certain specifications. If you have not purchased a new or resurfaced flywheel with your clutch, you will need to have your original part resurfaced. It is advised that whoever performs the resurfacing do so on both sides of the flywheel, on the surface and on the back where the flywheel meets the back of the crankshaft. This is to ensure proper flatness for long-lasting operation.

 

 

 

STEP

ACTION

 

 

1

If you have elected to install a new pilot bearing during this installation, now is the time to remove the old one and install the new one. You will need both a sharp chisel and hammer or an air hammer to remove the old bearing. To install the new one you will need a socket or a section of pipe that is the same diameter of the outside of the bearing.

 

NOTE: Do not use anything smaller then the outside edge of the bearing, because hammering anywhere else on the bearing will damage it.

 

NOTE: Make sure you install the new bearing with the beveled side out and flat side in towards the crank. Seat the new bearing and tap into place with a hammer and socket or pipe. Hammer the new bearing in until it is flush with the inside of the crank.

 

 

2

When installing your new or resurfaced flywheel, place a dab of blue loctite on the threaded ends of the bolts and torque them in a crisscross pattern to:

First pass 15 Lb ft.

Second pass 37 Lb ft.

Final pass 74 Lb ft.

 

 

3

Clean the surface of the flywheel with brake or parts cleaner before installing the new clutch disk and pressure plate. Do the same on the surface of the pressure plate. Place the new disk and pressure plate up to the surface of the flywheel as a unit.

 

NOTE: Make sure the disk facing the correct way. There will be a "flywheel side" listed on one side of the clutch disk.

 

After placing a dab of blue loctite on each of the pressure plate bolts, install and tighten them until you feel tension. Take your clutch alignment tool and install it through the pressure plate, clutch disk and pilot bearing. Torque all of the bolts in a crisscross pattern in three steps

First pass 35 Lb ft.

Second pass 45 Lb ft.

Final pass 50 Lb ft

 

Once done, the clutch alignment tool should slide in and out with ease, showing that the clutch disk, pressure plate and pilot bearing are in total alignment.

 

 

4

Before re-installing your bell housing, place a dab of anti-seize compound on the two alignment dowels located on the back of the engine, as well as the ones found on the bell housing itself. This will help eliminate the seizure problem you encountered earlier and ease the installation of the transmission. Reinstall your bell housing and torque the bolts to 35 Lb ft.

 

 

5

Remove the two 10mm bolts that hold your original throw-out bearing assembly to your transmission. Replace the slave. Place a small dab of red loctite on the bolts after cleaning them and reinstall. Torque the bolts to 71 Lb in. (

 

 

6

Reinstall your transmission. Again, it is advised to have a second person helping you perform this task. The transmission may require some maneuvering to fall into place. It may, however, eventually end up flush with the bell housing, or probably with space between the two. Because the new PPs may cause a gap to occur this is where you bring in the 4 bolts noted in the parts list. Space the bolts on the corners of the transmission and EVENLY bring the bolts in to get the transmission to mate with the bell housing. DO THIS VERY carefully. We made sure the spline was engaged with the clutch plate by turning the pulley crank bolt to make sure that the rear of the transmission was moving as the crank was turned. If your transmission mates flush or has very little space separating it, you can simply use the stock bolts during this step. You can now reinstall the stock bolts in the rest of the holes and then one by one remove the long bolts and replace them with the stock bolts and tighten to 36 Lb ft.

 

 

7

You can now reinstall the driver's side oxygen sensor if you chose to remove it.

 

 

8

Reinstall your car's torque arm, tightening the back nuts-and-bolts to 85 Lb ft. and the front bolt to 35 Lb ft.

 

 

9

Now put back your transmission's cross-member, tightening the outer bolts to 30 Lb ft. and the center nut to 45 Lb ft.

 

 

10

Reinstall your car's driveshaft, tightening the bolts to 16 Lb ft.

 

 

11

You can now to go to the top of the car and reinstall your car's shifter and console assembly. Before installing the shifter base, clean the surface of old silicone and re-apply new silicone. Tighten the shifter base bolts to 15 Lb ft. and the shifter handle to 20 Lb ft.

 

 

IF

Then

 

 

You are replacing your Clutch Master Cylinder

go to Step 12

 

 

This was the last item to install

End Instructions

 

 

12

Next, you will now need to replace your car's Master cylinder assembly, located in the engine compartment and under your car's dashboard. Start by removing the two screws and 7mm bolts that hold up the dash's bottom cover. With that out of the way you can remove the internal cover by unscrewing the two 7mm bolts that hold it in-place.

 

 

14

With a long flat-tip screwdriver pry the Master cylinder rod, retaining clip from the clutch pedal lever. Then pull the rod from the lever.

 

 

15

With a 13mm socket and long extension on a 3/8-inch drive ratchet, remove the four nuts that hold your car's power brake booster in-place and the two 13mm nuts that hold the Master cylinder in-place.

 

 

16

Now, go under your car's hood and remove the two 10mm bolts that hold the driver's side air injection tube to the exhaust manifold (or header if you've installed them). Loop the tube over the intake to keep it out of the way.

 

 

17

Remove the two 15mm nuts that hold the Master cylinder to the power booster, and then disconnect the electrical connector located on the driver's side of the reservoir.

 

 

18

Loosen the two 13mm nuts located on either side of the ABS block and slide the whole box up and out of the holder. With the master cylinder disconnected, the whole assembly, from the Master cylinder to the ABS block, will come up and out f the way.

 

 

19

Pry the Master cylinder reservoir away from the bracket with a flat-head screwdriver.

 

 

20

Move the power booster out of the way and reach underneath it and pull the Master cylinder toward the front of the car, then up and out. The whole assembly should come out as one piece, the line, slave and reservoir.

 

 

21

Pull the "U"-shaped bracket away from the original Master cylinder and install it in the new Master.

 

 

22

Feed the new Master cylinder assembly back down under the power booster, routing the reservoir and hydraulic lines back to their original locations.

 

 

23

You can now reinstall your power booster, Master cylinder, ABS block and air injection tube.

 

 

24

Now go back under the car and connect the hydraulic line to the transmission. Press the end of the line into the brass fitting on the driver's side of the transmission. You can then replace the heat shield for the line.

 

 

25

Go back under your car's dashboard and slide the eye-lit of the Master cylinder rod back over the clutch pedal lever and replace the retaining clip. Now bolt back in the power booster and Master cylinder bracket.

 

 

26

To adjust the Master cylinder rod for travel, start with the rod fully unadjusted (with minimal threads showing) then pump the clutch pedal several times. Start the car and attempt to put shifter into first gear. If the shifter does not go into gear, turn off engine and adjust rod out one full turn. Repeat this process until the shifter goes into first and reverse gears freely.

 

 

27

You can now replace the dash panels.